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How to Create a Content Distribution Strategy - VQ Success

How to Create a Content Distribution Strategy

A Content Distribution Strategy is a plan for publishing and promoting your content to a clearly-defined buyer persona using multiple media formats and distributed through various communication channels. These content distribution channels can be categorized

Content Distribution Strategy: a plan for publishing and promoting your content to a clearly-defined buyer persona using multiple media formats distributed through various channels. Content distribution channels can be categorized into three types: paid channels, earned channels, and owned channels.

Content Distribution Channel: a path or route used to deliver content marketing messages to a clearly-defined buyer persona. The channel can be as short as a direct exchange between the organization and the customer or can involve the use of content distribution platforms like social media sites or search engines.

Topics Covered in This Article

This article on Content Distribution Strategy (last updated Sunday, December 26th 2021) is brought to you by VQ Success, a Content Marketing Agency that specializes in content-rich website articles and email campaigns for attracting high-quality leads and converting them into loyal customers.

Content Distribution Strategy and Best Practices

The third step of your Content Marketing Strategy is to create and implement a content distribution strategy.

This starts with finding the best content distribution channels for reaching your target audience, tracking your progress, and optimizing your messages.

Rubber Chicken Marketers pick marketing channels according to what’s popular. This is a quick way to bust your marketing budget with little or no return.

Content Distribution Strategy

Smart content marketers, however, pick channels where they can make the biggest impact on their audience. They also pick channels that allow them to track and optimize their content marketing ROI so they can achieve their content marketing goals while reducing their overall marketing costs. 

This article explains how to build and implement a Content Distribution Strategy, starting with the three types of content distribution channels. We’ll cover three rules for picking the best channels, and then give you a simple blueprint for building and implementing your content distribution schedule. 

NOTE: this article mentions three concepts which we cover in other articles, including our articles on 1) The VQ Success Content Marketing Strategy, 2) How to Create a Buyer’s Persona, and 3) The Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey.

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Types of Content Distribution Channels

  • Paid: channels where you pay to have your content published.
  • Earned: channels where you earn the right to publish your content.
  • Owned: channels where you own and control the means of distribution.
Content Distribution Strategy

Each of these types of distribution channels has its own advantages and disadvantages. When you maximize the advantages of each channel, their disadvantages become irrelevant and your results become more consistently profitable and sustainable. 

Paid Channels

Description: channels where you pay to have your content published.

  • Examples: online pay per click ads, paid social media postings, magazine advertorials, video platform ads, paid radio broadcasts, TV infomercials.
  • Advantages: fast and direct access to your target audience. High potential for reaching large numbers of new prospects.
  • Disadvantages: financial costs are higher than those for earned and owned channels. Heavy competition. Your messages will also have to meet the content standards for the platform.

Earned Channels

Description: channels where you earn the right to publish your content.

  • Examples: search engine rankings, your social media pages*, guest blogs, opinion columns on news websites, monthly magazine columns, guest appearances on podcasts, radio shows, or TV shows.
  • Advantages: direct access to your target audience. High potential for reaching new prospects. High potential for boosting your perceived credibility. Can be leveraged to earn more publicity.
  • Disadvantages: time and labor costs are much higher than those for paid channels. High rejection rates. Your messages will also have to meet the content standards for the platform.

*I explain below why social media pages are earned channels and not owned channels.

Owned Channels

Description: channels where you own and control the means of distribution.

  • Examples: your website’s RSS feed, your email list, your direct mail newsletter, your podcast or radio show, print publications owned and distributed by your brand. 
  • Advantages: exclusive access to your target audience. Almost no third party content restrictions*. Much less expensive to publish and distribute content. More control over your data and tracking. Evergreen potential.
  • Disadvantages: takes time to attract viewers and subscribers and build your audience.

*Some service providers (website, email, or video hosting services) may cancel you for content they find unacceptable.

These content distribution channels can be online, or offline. The important point is to use the channels that help you achieve your content marketing goals and increase your content marketing ROI. Before we talk about that, let me say one more word about the difference between earned and owned channels.

(Click here if you prefer to skip my rant) 

Social Media Pages are NOT Owned Channels

Your Social Media accounts are not yours. They are owned by the Social Media company that hosts those pages. This could change at some point in the future, in which case I’ll update this article. However, as long as Social Media websites have the legal right to shadowban, suspend, or even cancel and delete your accounts, it’s a risk to treat your Social Media accounts and pages as owned channels. 

In 2014, a client in the self-help niche hired me and my team to create a training course to promote to his Facebook fans. At the time, he had hundreds of thousands of fans and several years of posts and responses built up.

Once created, the training course started pulling in thousands of dollars a month in sales. Knowing this was not a sustainable strategy, I urged my client to expand his content distribution strategy and start focusing on Content Equity.

Content Distribution Strategy

He ignored my advice, and I eventually quit him to pursue other projects. At the end of 2016, I emailed him to see how his business was going. He hadn’t taken my advice, and his page had been suspended over one of Facebook’s now-infamous “community standard violations.” With no email or direct mail list and no content equity, his sales had flatlined and he could longer even pay his monthly bills.

The last time I talked to him (in 2018), he was working customer service for a measly $30,000.00 a year and trying to rebuild his business in his spare time. All this because he mistakenly believed that he “owned” his Facebook page. This is, of course, an extreme example. But it proves an important point about the difference between earned content distribution channels and owned content distribution channels. 

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Three Rules for Picking Content Distribution Channels

The PRIMARY goal of your content distribution strategy should be to use Paid channels and Earned channels to increase the strength and sustainability of your Owned channels. 

Everything you do on your paid and owned channels should be done with this end goal in mind. This is the foundational principle of choosing good content distribution channels. The following three rules will help you apply it.

Content Distribution Strategy

Content Distribution Rule #1: Content Equity

Every content distribution channel you use should help you build Content Equity. This is the first rule of content distribution. Content Equity, as defined below, is the most valuable of the Five Benefits of a Content Marketing Strategy: 

Content Equity: the cumulative value of a brand's published content (online or offline ) in terms of its capacity to attract and convert customers and to increase ROI by improving key marketing KPIs (e.g., lead generation rates, cost per lead, conversion rates, cost per aquisition, total value per sale, total value per customer, etc.).

A good example of Content Equity is a local business with hundreds of positive customer reviews published on trustworthy review sites. Those reviews will attract a steady flow of inbound leads, even when the business isn’t actively marketing for new customers. Stage#3 Prospects will also find these reviews while researching and comparing companies.

Most importantly, by the time these prospects talk to a salesperson, they’ll be more likely to make a buying decision and pay premium prices for what they perceive to be a higher quality product or service. In other words, positive and credible online reviews have an evergreen ability to generate new business for a company. This is what I mean by Content Equity, and it applies to more than just online reviews. 

Smart content marketers build content equity using relevant, credible, and well-crafted articles, videos, infographics, white-papers, and podcasts. If this content is consistently showing up at the top of search results, or getting shared on social media, picked up by journalists, linked to by other bloggers, or mentioned on podcasts, radio, or TV shows, it the same effect to the positive reviews mentioned above. 

Every content distribution channel you use should help you build Content Equity. All the content you publish on paid or earned platforms should be used to drive traffic to your website, build your email and direct mail subscriber list, get sign ups for a membership site or help you build up your other owned channels. While building your content distribution strategy, ask yourself which channels will best help you achieve this long term goal. 

Content Distribution Rule #2: Audience Relevance

Every content distribution channel you use should help you reach the target audience defined by your Buyer Persona(s). Well-meaning, yet naive marketing enthusiasts often say things like…

  • “You need to be posting on Facebook!”
  • “Pinterest is big now. You need to be on Pinterest!”
  • “If your business isn’t on YouTube, you’re missing out on lots of customers!”

Some will even quote statistics, saying:

“Four million people use ____, so if you’re not marketing there, you’re missing out on a LOT of prospective customers!”

These statements are based on the outdated idea that marketing is about getting your message in front of as many eyeballs as possible. This is a quick way to burn up your marketing budget with little or no return.

A recent Survey from Rakuten Marketing found that marketers estimate to have wasted 26 percent of their budget on the wrong strategies and channels. According to a 2016 Study from Nielsen’s Digital Ad Ratings, about 48% of all online ad budgets were wasted because they were not reaching the right audience. This is why a good content marketing agency will never advise you to market somewhere just because it’s cheap, popular, or new.

The more important question is whether a content distribution channel gives you targeted access to the audience defined by your buyer persona(s). If it does, put it on your shortlist. If not, leave it off. Never mind how popular it is or how many of your competitors are marketing there. Content marketing isn’t about showing up everywhere. It’s about showing up where your target audience is most likely to find you.

Content Distribution Rule #3: Brand Credibility

Every content distribution channel you use should increase your brand’s credibility with your target audience. This content distribution rule is based common sense that even non-marketers can understand.

All other things being equal, I’m sure you’d feel better about hiring a lawyer you met at a fundraiser dinner than one you met at the dollar store. I’m also sure you’d prefer that your daughter meet your future son-in-law at college instead of a night club. 

Likewise, where you publish your content has a tremendous impact on how credible you appear to your audience. This is why the third and final rule of content distribution is to choose channels where you’ll appear credible simply for showing up there. For example, most marketers would agree that advertising on a spam site would make your brand look low budget while an article published in a popular print magazine would have the opposite impression.

This rule simply has you consider the credibility differences between all your content distribution channels, and create a shortlist of your most credible channels, like this:

  • Paid Channels: LinkedIn, Success Magazine.
  • Earned Channels: YouTube, Forbes.com.
  • Owned Channels: Website, Newsletter(s).

Of course, you do this only after finding the channels that will help you build Content Equity and where your target audience is most likely to find you. This should include content distribution channels that will build national or global credibility with your target audience.

For example, if you’re selling beauty products, it might be smart to pay (once) for a full-page advertorial in Allure magazine so you can credibly claim to have been published there. If you’re a business consultant, it might be worth the money or effort to get one of your articles published in Success magazine or on their website.

Sometimes, it makes sense to do this even if the article doesn’t generate a profitable response. The question is whether adding “as seen in Success Magazine” or “as seen in GQ Magazine” to your content will increase the perceived credibility of your brand enough to boost your long term results. While we’re on this topic, let me debunk a common misconception about content distribution channels. 

(Click here if you prefer to skip my rant) 

Your content distribution strategy should include online and offline channels. Over the years, I’ve had to work hard to convince B2B service providers (business consultants, counselors) to use direct mail for reaching out to new and existing clients. Some have even laughed at me, claiming that email is “cheaper” or that they can “reach more people that way.”

This is a shortsighted way to evaluate or compare content distribution channels. The question isn’t how cheap or popular a channel is, the question is whether the channel will yield Return on Investment (ROI). Here are five statistics that prove Direct Mail is a valuable content distribution channel, especially for reaching out to your existing customer:

  • The Data & Marketing Association found that, in 2018, Direct Mail response rates (averaging 5% and 9% depending on the recipient) were several times better than email (averaging 1% response rates).
  • Stats from the United States Postal Service show that 60% of catalog recipients visit the website of the company that mailed them the catalog.
  • According to 2018 data from The Data & Marketing Association, Generation Xers (45 – 55) were the group most likely to respond to Direct Mail.
  • Epsilon’s Direct Mail Marketing stats show that 73% of US consumers prefer direct mail for communicating with their favorite brands because they can review it when they see fit.
  • In 2018, when “Which is more effective at getting you to take action?” 30% of millennials said direct mail (only 24% said email).
  • According to Data & Marketing Association, up to 90% of direct mail gets opened, compared a 20-30% open rate for emails.

Source: SmallBizGenius.com article on Direct Mail Statistics.

Direct Mail gives you a higher perception of value and sophistication that email simply can’t offer. Sure, it might not make sense to physically mail content to people who have never bought from you. But you should definitely use it to reach customers who have already bought from you (aka, Stage #5 Prospects). 

Your customers are already being bombarded by marketing emails and online content. You can stand out from this crowd by using online and offline content distribution channels to reach them. Think about the loads of cold emails you get every day from people trying to sell you things.

Compare this to the amount of well designed, well crafted, high-quality articles or newsletters you get in the mail. By showing up in your customer’s mailbox two or three times a year, you put your brand in a league of its own.

Three Rules of Content Distribution – Summary

  • Content Equity: Your distribution channels should help you build Content Equity. 
  • Audience Relevance: Your content distribution channels should help you reach your buyer persona(s).
  • Brand Credibility: Your content distribution channels should increase your brand’s credibility.

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Sample Content Distribution Strategy

Your Content Distribution Strategy is an actionable plan for creating, publishing, and promoting using your selected distribution channels. When done right, this strategy gives you an evergreen blueprint for creating, publishing, promoting, and tracking your content on a monthly, weekly, and daily, basis. Creating your content distribution strategy involves three steps:

  • Pick Your Content Distribution Channels.
  • Assign Content Types (Using The Buyer’s Journey).
  • Create Your “Content Pantry” and Distribution Schedule.

Once these steps are done, you simply use your content creation and distribution schedule to implement your content marketing strategy. 

Content Distribution Strategy

Step #1: Pick Your Distribution Channels

Use the three content distribution rules discussed above to create a shortlist of your best content distribution channels, arranged according to their channel type:

  • Paid Channels: LinkedIn, Success Magazine.
  • Earned Channels: YouTube, Forbes.com.
  • Owned Channels: Website, Newsletter(s).

The sample content distribution strategy below will be based on this list.

Step #2: Pick Your Content Types

Use your list of content distribution channels to decide which content types (aka, media formats) you plan to publish on each channel. I suggest you organize these content types using to the Five Stages of The VQ Success Buyer’s Journey, as in this example:

Buyer’s Journey Stage #1

Description: These prospects are indifferent about the PROBLEM your product or service solves.

Content Marketing Objectives:

  • Show Them How Relevant Their Problem Is.
  • Show Them How Critical Their Problem Is.
  • Show Them How Urgent Their Problem Is.

See our Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey article for more details on Stage #1 messaging strategies.

VQ Success Buyer's Journey Stage 1

Stage #1 Content Types (By Distribution Channel):

  • LinkedIn (Paid): teaser articles.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): advertorials.
  • YouTube (Earned): explainer videos.
  • Forbes.com (Earned): guest articles.
  • Website (Owned): SEO articles.
  • Newsletter (Owned): NA.

*You are reading the VQ Success Content Distribution Strategy article.

Buyer’s Journey Stage #2

Description: These prospects are curious about the available SOLUTIONS to their problem.

Content Marketing Objectives:

  • Change Their Perspective of The Problem.
  • Debunk The Competing Solutions.
  • Sell Them On Your Type of Product or Service.

See our Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey article for more details on Stage #2 messaging strategies.

VQ Success Buyer's Journey Stage 2

Stage #2 Content Types (By Distribution Channel):

  • LinkedIn (Paid): teaser articles.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): advertorials.
  • YouTube (Earned): explainer videos.
  • Forbes.com (Earned): guest articles.
  • Website (Owned): SEO articles.
  • Newsletter (Owned): educational emails.

*You are reading the VQ Success Content Distribution Strategy article.

Buyer’s Journey Stage #3

Description: These prospects are sold on your TYPE of solution and comparing a list of brands.

Content Marketing Objectives:

  • Sell Them On The Relevance of Your Brand.
  • Sell Them On The Superiority of Your Brand.
  • Sell Them On The Uniqueness of Your Brand.

See our Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey article for more details on Stage #3 messaging strategies.

VQ Success Buyer's Journey Stage 3

Stage #3 Content Types (By Distribution Channel):

  • LinkedIn (Paid): ads promoting sales pages.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): NA.
  • YouTube (Earned): explainer videos.
  • Forbes.com (Earned): NA.
  • Website (Owned): sales pages.
  • Newsletter (Owned): sales emails.

*You are reading the VQ Success Content Distribution Strategy article.

Buyer’s Journey Stage #4

Description: These prospects are sold on your BRAND, but haven’t completed a purchase yet. 

Content Marketing Objectives:

  • Address Common Objections.
  • Tell Them What Will Happen Next.
  • Give Them a Reason to Act Now.

See our Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey article for more details on Stage #4 messaging strategies.

VQ Success Buyer's Journey Stage 4

Stage #4 Content Types (By Distribution Channel):

  • LinkedIn (Paid): ads promoting sales pages.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): NA.
  • YouTube (Earned): NA.
  • Forbes.com (Earned): NA.
  • Website (Owned): order pages.
  • Newsletter (Owned): emails promoting order pages.

*You are reading the VQ Success Content Distribution Strategy article.

Buyer’s Journey Stage #5

Description: Customers who have the potential to become more loyal and profitable.

Content Marketing Objectives:

  • To Earn Repeat Business.
  • To Earn Positive Reviews.
  • To Earn Referral Business.
  • To Win Back Lost Customers.

See our Buyer’s Journey vs Customer Journey article for more details on Stage #5 messaging strategies.

VQ Success Buyer's Journey Stage 5

Stage #5 Content Types (By Distribution Channel):

  • Website (Owned): members-only pages.
  • SMS Newsletter (Owned): links to new offers.
  • Email Newsletter (Owned): email newsletters.
  • Direct Mail Newsletter (Owned): greeting cards.

*You are reading the VQ Success Content Distribution Strategy article.

Step #3: Create Your “Content Pantry” and Distribution Schedule

A Content Pantry, as defined below, is a shortcut to implementing your content creation and distribution strategy without the usual chaos that goes with managing large scale marketing projects (i.e., miscommunications, blown budgets, missed deadlines, etc.):

Content Pantry: a collection of "seed content" that you use to create all your other marketing content in a variety of media formats. Your content pantry might include: a printed book, a collection of 12 to 30 high-quality articles, or simply a file with messages targeting your Buyer Persona(s) at each stage of The VQ Success Buyer's Journey.

Think of your Content Marketing Pantry like the pantry in your kitchen. When you go to your kitchen to prepare a meal, most of the ingredients are already in your pantry. This saves the time of having to run to the store or create an ingredient from scratch.

Likewise, your Content Pantry makes it easy to consistently create and publish high-quality content for all your distribution channels. It’s hard to overstate how much time and energy this will save you, long and short term.

Content Marketing Pantry

When done right, your Content Pantry can be used to created dozens of pieces of content, in multiple media formats, for all of your content distribution channels. I explain how to do this in our article on how to create and implement a Content Creation Plan. In case this idea is still unclear, let me give you a hypothetical story about a Content Pantry in action.

(Click here if you prefer to skip this example)

Imagine you’re a financial consultant who specializes in helping married couples build and execute a retirement plan. You’ve already written a start-to-finish book on financial management for married couples. Now you want to use content marketing to promote your book and find new clients. You have two options for doing this.

You could spin your wheels trying to create a brand-new website article, explainer video, and a half-dozen new social media posts every month. Or you could, using your book as your Content Pantry, create dozens of pieces of content (in multiple media formats) based on the most salient ideas, examples, stories, and data points from the book. This second option solves two problems.

  • It gives you a consistent and sequential messaging across all your content distribution channels.
  • It makes your life a WHOLE lot easier by eliminating the need to come up with ideas for new content. 

In my experience, one of the hardest parts of implementing a content marketing strategy is the constant pressure to  create and publish new content every month, every week, or even every day.

Another challenge is making sure that there’s a consistency in your messages across all your content distribution channels and media formats. Working from a Content Pantry solves these problems, and more. 

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Sample Content Distribution Schedule

Once you’ve picked your content distribution channels and content types, you’re ready to create your content distribution schedule. Your content distribution schedule is a practical to-do list for your content marketing team. It tells you and your team when to create and distribute your content.

The sample content distribution schedule below will be derived from four-pieces of seed content:

  • Your Stage #3 Sales Page.
  • Your Stage #4 Order Page.
  • A Monthly Blog Article.
  • Your Quarterly Newsletter.

These four pieces of content make up your Content Pantry. These first two pieces of seed content (your Stage #3 Sales Page and your Stage #4 Order Page) only need to be created once. Your Blog Article and your Quarterly Newsletter will need to be created every month, and every three months, respectively.

The rest of your monthly, weekly, and daily content will simply be derived form one of these four pieces of seed content, as in the sample content distribution schedule below. I have highlighted the four pieces of seed content in read for clarity:

  • Content Goal: get your prospect to subscribe for your Stage #2 educational emails.
  • Seed Content: monthly Blog Article based on your Stage #1 and Stage #2 messaging strategies. 

Monthly Stage #1 Content

  • Website (Owned): Blog Article (Stage #1 and #2 Seed Content).
  • LinkedIn (Paid): sponsored post using Stage #1 content from Blog Article. Link to the full website version of Blog Article so readers can learn more.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): advertorial based on Stage #1 content in Blog Article. Include a link and QR code to the full website version of Blog Article so readers can learn more.

Weekly Stage #1 Content

  • YouTube (Earned): teaser video using Stage #1 content from Blog Article. Embed this video in the full website version of Blog Article and include a link to the article so readers can learn more.
  • Social Media (Earned): short post promoting teaser video.

Daily Stage #1 Content

  • Social Media (Earned): short post using Stage #1 content from Blog Article.
  • Content Goal: get your prospect to subscribe for your Stage #3 promotional emails.
  • Seed Content: monthly Blog Article based on your Stage #1 and Stage #2 messaging strategies. 

Monthly Stage #2 Content

  • Website (Owned): Blog Article (Stage #1 and #2 seed content).
  • LinkedIn (Paid): sponsored post using Stage #2 content from Blog Article. Link to the website version of Blog Article so readers can learn more.
  • Success Magazine (Paid): advertorial based on the most salient Stage #2 content in Blog Article. Include a link and QR code to the full website version of Blog Article so readers can learn more.

Weekly Stage #2 Content

  • YouTube (Earned): teaser video using Stage #2 content from Blog Article. Embed video in the full website version of Blog Article and include a link to the article so readers can learn more.
  • Social Media (Earned): short post promoting teaser video.

Daily Stage #2 Content

  • Social Media (Earned): short post using Stage #2 content from Blog Article.
  • Content Goal: get your prospect to visit Stage #4 order page and become a customer. 
  • Seed Content: Stage #3 Sales Page (with text and video content, customer reviews, etc.).  

Monthly Stage #3 Content

  • Website (Owned): update Stage #3 Sales Page.
  • LinkedIn (Paid): ad promoting Stage #3 Sales Page.

Weekly Stage #3 Content

  • YouTube (Earned): teaser video using content from Stage #3 Sales Page. Embed video in the Stage #3 Sales Page and include a link to the page so prospects can learn more.
  • Newsletter (Owned): sales email using content from Stage #3 Sales Page.

Daily Stage #3 Content

  • Social Media (Earned): promotional post using Stage #3 Sales Page content.
  • Content Goal: get your prospect to visit Stage #4 order page and become a customer. 
  • Seed Content: Stage #4 Order Page (with text and video content, customer reviews, etc.).  

Monthly Stage #4 Content

  • Website (Owned): update Stage #4 Order Page.
  • LinkedIn (Paid): ad promoting Stage #4 Order Page.

Weekly Stage #4 Content

  • Newsletter (Owned): sales email using Stage #4 Order Page content.
  • Content Goal: get your customer to spend more, write a positive review, or refer a colleague.
  • Seed Content: Quarterly Newsletter.

Monthly Stage #5 Content

  • Newsletter (Owned): Quarterly Newsletter.
  • YouTube (Earned): teaser video using content from Quarterly Newsletter.

Weekly Stage #5 Content

  • Newsletter (Owned): sales email promoting offer from Quarterly Newsletter.
  • Social Media (Earned): promotional post using Quarterly Newsletter content.

Once you have your content distribution schedule created, you have completed the fourth step of the VQ Success Content Marketing Strategy. The next step would be to use your content distribution schedule to build implement your Content Creation Plan. I highly recommend you read our Content Creation Plan and Implementation article for a step by step strategy on this next step. 

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Final Thoughts on Your Content Distribution Strategy

We hope you enjoyed this article on How to Create a Content Distribution Strategy.

In closing, let me answer a question I sometimes get about the difference between the Buyer’s Journey and a Marketing Funnel. While these are two separate concepts, they can also work together. It all depends on how smart you are in setting up your content distribution strategy and integrating it with your marketing funnel.

A good marketing funnel should allow you to track user behaviors, segment your prospects (and your customers), and deliver messages that are customized for three things:

  • Their Buyer Persona (aka, demographic).
  • Their Stage in the Buyer’s (or Customer) Journey.
  • Their Content Interests (topics, media type, etc).

These three levels of user segmenting are vital to building an efficient marketing automation funnel. This requires good marketing automation technology, which can be expensive and complicated to set up. 

Content Distribution Strategy

Rubber Chicken Marketers are typically too lazy to do this much work. Sure, they might set up a marketing funnel and customize messages according to the prospect’s stage in the funnel. But that’s as far as it goes. Smart marketers segment prospects by their Buyer Persona, their stage in the Buyer’s Journey (or customer journey), and according to their content and/or product interests. 

If your website is built on WordPress, I suggest getting the Vervenia Marketing Automation Plugin for WordPress. It’s the only WordPress marketing automation plugin that gives you all these features:

Most importantly, it’s user segmenting features allow you to segment and tag your prospects and customers according to their audience (buyer persona), their stage in the buyer’s journey, and their content or product interests.

Don’t assume that every lead in your marketing funnel is at a certain stage of The VQ Success Buyer’s Journey. Some of your new email subscribers will be at Stage #2, while others will be at Stage #3 or even Stage #4. Your website visits, social media views, and pay per click impressions may come from prospects at Stage #1, #2, #3, or even Stage #4 or #5. The same is true for every stage of your marketing funnel, and for all of your content distribution channels. 

This is why it’s important to invest in the right marketing automation technology and to set up a marketing funnel that allows you to segment your prospects AND customers and get the best messages and offers in front of them. The more you do this, the more effective and profitable your content marketing strategy will be.

This concludes our article on How to Create a Content Distribution Strategy.

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